“Whether it be through academic advisement or financial and moral support, Macaulay enabled me focus on what I really wanted to do in college: be a student.”

Her research has been just wild, and that’s no exaggeration from Jasmine Calle, who has long wanted to study animal life. The biochemistry major at the College of Staten Island wanted to work in veterinary science from childhood, but also found a new approach to this work when she began research in her sophomore year in high school in the Arenas-Mena Laboratory.

“As soon as I started working in the lab, I knew that research was something I wanted to incorporate into my career,” said Jasmine. “Initially, this was an issue because I wanted to be a veterinarian since childhood and was not willing to give it up. I thought I would have to choose! Fortunately, I discovered that I could do both.”

Jasmine has since done additional lab and research work while at Macaulay, working with programs involved in increasing the number of underrepresented students pursuing graduate and bachelor’s degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. The St. John Villa Academy graduate also worked as a docent at the Staten Island Zoo, which quickly became her second home, helping to disseminate the knowledge of zoology and an appreciation of animal life.

“My goal is to become a veterinary researcher, in order to combat the diseases that plague the animal world, which, lest we forget, is closely linked to our world.”

Jasmine also has spent each of her four years serving on the Macaulay Scholars Council, most recently as the vice president of academic affairs. She continued to teach catechetical studies in her free time, maintaining her closeness to her Roman Catholic religion. Besides being on the Dean’s List, Jasmine is also a Lisa Goldberg Revson Scholar.

She used her Opportunities Fund for a class on Evolution, Ecology, and Conservation in Ecuador and the Galapagos. Her parents are originally from Ecuador and have been a great source of inspiration for her. “[My mom] is a pretty awesome lady; she has been my rock,” said Jasmine. Her dad routinely works from 9 in the morning until after 11pm at night, about which Jasmine said: “in all the years he has been working, I have never once heard him complain. His work ethic is one I admire.”

Jasmine will begin studies in veterinary science at Cornell University in August. Prior to that, she will be participating in a biomedical research program at Cornell called the Cornell Veterinary Investigator Program, provided by the Merial Veterinary Scholars Program. She believes her time at Macaulay has helped her reach her goals.

“Whether it be through academic advisement or financial and moral support, Macaulay enabled me focus on what I really wanted to do in college: be a student.”

Student Jasmine Calle '16 in labaratory.
X